SF Transit Hub or 19th Ave Tunnel? 

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"The cost-benefit ratio of the Transbay Terminal is really absurd," said Bill Blackwell, a retired Bechtel architect, who contends that the new terminal costs aren't justified by the improvements for transit riders. "People seem to think we need a new monument," Blackwell said. "We don't need a fancy new terminal. It doesn't do anything to enhance transit use."

For that kind of money we should be doing SOMETHING that will actually
relieve Traffic Congestion
.
Instead of spending $3 4.5 billion (prob $7 bil.) on a

cost-ineffective
Transbay Terminal,
( A statewide high-speed rail bond dropped from the November 2004 election,
may never be re-submitted. )

Lets spend it on something that will
directly
reduce CONGESTION
and air-pollution - the
 
19th Ave Tunnel bypass 

  • 2007-2013 2017
Project Construction
  • 2004-2007
Engineering & Design
  • Feb 2005
Federal Transit Administration issues Record of Decision (ROD)
  • June 2004
SF Board of Supervisors affirms certification of the FEIS/EIR
  • April 2004

Final EIS/EIR certified by the San Francisco Redevelopment Commission, San Francisco Planning Commission, and Peninsula Corridor Joint Powers Board.  Project, with CEQA findings and a mitigation monitoring program, formally adopted by the TJPA Board

RFPs issued for Program Management/Program Controls Consultant as well as Manager for International Architectural Competition.  PM/PC contract awarded to URS Corporation/Hatch Mott MacDonald/EPC Consultants in November 2004; Competition Manager negotiations underway with Stastnybrun Architects/H. Fried Associates

  • Mar 2004
Regional Measure 2 is approved by the voters and allocates an additional $150 million in project funding 

 

  2016 the SINKING luxury condo building in San Francisco, the Millennium Tower,  the building is sinking and tilting at an unexpected rate - blamed on Transbay Terminal excavations

2005 - Transit hub moves ahead, even if train never arrives  (Matier and Ross)

Think of it as the "Terminal of Dreams" -- a new Transbay Terminal and high-rise in San Francisco that is gaining momentum without so much as a promise that the money or high-speed railroad needed to make it happen will ever be there.

Today, the Transbay Joint Powers Authority will announce plans for an international design competition for the four-story terminal and a 70-story hotel, condo and retail tower. That would be about on par with San Francisco's tallest building, the Transamerica Pyramid.

"It creates a world-class transit hub linking the Bay Area's most vital commuter systems and surrounds it with a new neighborhood,'' said Mike Nevin, chairman of the joint powers agency.

The tricky part, transit insiders say, is that the agency has pledges for only half the project's $2 4.5 billion estimated cost.

The other half won't materialize unless state voters pass a bond for a $10 billion bullet train from San Francisco to Los Angeles -- a project that keeps being pushed onto a side track and may not even make the ballot for years.

Nonetheless, the locals say they're ready to move forward -- and up -- with or without the bullet train money. Their big fear is that delays will only drive up costs.

The idea, then, is to start construction and line up a developer to finance the project while the hotel and housing market is still strong, in the hope that if they build it, the bullet train -- and bullet train money -- will come.

And if the train never arrives?

"It's going to be a transit center hosting bus, rail, BART and Muni Metro'' via an underground people mover, said Adam Alberti, spokesman for the Joint Powers Authority.

So in other words, they're hoping the money already promised, plus some financial magic, will be enough to build at least a basic terminal plus the tower.

And the sooner they get going on project, Alberti said, "the cheaper it's going to be to build.''

Or overbuild.

 

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